(Source: wolfliving, via brucesterling)

reloadbags:

Near mint Colnago straight blade fork. Roland was gonna use this on a build years ago, never did. 1” threadless steerer. anybody interested? #colnago #datfork #straightblade via Instagram http://ift.tt/1v0m8Iv

mmmmm straight fork….

reloadbags:

Near mint Colnago straight blade fork. Roland was gonna use this on a build years ago, never did. 1” threadless steerer. anybody interested? #colnago #datfork #straightblade via Instagram http://ift.tt/1v0m8Iv

mmmmm straight fork….

back from 2500+ miles on a honda 250. US route 13 & 17 down and back, with some accidental 64, 301, 601.
ALT BUS TRUCK route. or not.
swamps, forest, farms and the ruralest of rural to 6 lanes of construction-filled interstate highway exchanges determined to dump you on 95 (looking at you jacksonville, fl).  my camping skills are non-existent, as is my rain game, so I ended up moteling it several times. if i can get that in check, i’m headed to the west coast.

w-oman-and-m-achine:

This Sunday!
A Sunday Afternoon of Sound Art / Verge Sonics / Love Beats / Live Sound Process by: Rucyl http://rucyl.com/ Suzi Analogue http://suzianalogue.com/ Scraaatch http://scraaatch.tumblr.com/ facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/728632020516620/728632023849953/

w-oman-and-m-achine:

This Sunday!

A Sunday Afternoon of Sound Art / Verge Sonics / Love Beats / Live Sound Process by: Rucyl http://rucyl.com/ Suzi Analogue http://suzianalogue.com/ Scraaatch http://scraaatch.tumblr.com/ facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/728632020516620/728632023849953/

a-tem-po-ral:

16th century French cypher machine in the shape of a book with coat of arms of Henri II

a-tem-po-ral:

16th century French cypher machine in the shape of a book with coat of arms of Henri II

(via brucesterling)

worldcafe:

Genius!  “…it’s not just geography that’s limited people from hearing rock ‘n’ roll. For those living in the U.S.S.R. at the time, Stalin’s government had totally restricted the dissemination of Western music. But there was one group of people called “stilyagi” (or “hipsters,” as we’d call them today) who were able to effectively distribute and keep such music alive in the Soviet Union using one of the sneakiest, most inventive ways imaginable: They’d press records on disposed X-Rays, which they collected en masse from hospital dumpsters.” - coslive

worldcafe:

Genius!  “…it’s not just geography that’s limited people from hearing rock ‘n’ roll. For those living in the U.S.S.R. at the time, Stalin’s government had totally restricted the dissemination of Western music. But there was one group of people called “stilyagi” (or “hipsters,” as we’d call them today) who were able to effectively distribute and keep such music alive in the Soviet Union using one of the sneakiest, most inventive ways imaginable: They’d press records on disposed X-Rays, which they collected en masse from hospital dumpsters.” - coslive

catsitting in a (flamboyant) castlelotta pianos, less suits of armor than your average 16th & walnut law firm

catsitting in a (flamboyant) castle
lotta pianos, less suits of armor than your average 16th & walnut law firm

“’He sought not the author of music,’ explained Artemiev of his vague brief for Solaris, “but the organiser of audio space of the film.’
What sold Artemiev to Tarkovsky was a visit to the groundbreaking electronic music studio where Artemiev worked alongside the mathematician and optics engineer Yevgeny Murzin. The studio housed Murzin and Artemiev’s hulking metallic baby – the ANS synthesiser; an electronic music-making machine unlike any that had preceded or followed it.
Murzin began work on his synth in 1937 and it took 20 years to build. Research into new musical instruments was largely prohibited by the state, and despite the not-inconsiderable innovations of Leon Theremin, creating electronic instruments in Russia was considered a criminal act. Buying the required components was impossible, so inventors had to steal them from institutions…
Murzin’s hero was the early 20th Century occultist and composer Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin, who developed intricate and atonal musical systems based on theosophy, mysticism and synaesthesia. Christening his machine with Scriabin’s initials, Murzin set about applying some of the mystic’s methodology to electronic music.
For instance, the ANS did not work in 12-tone scales. Instead, it could summon 720 sine waves, which were printed across five glass discs. The discs were arranged so that the low frequencies were at the bottom of the disc and the high frequencies were at the top. Overall, the available microtones spanned 10 octaves.
For the composer to access the tones, they were required to scratch lines in non-drying black mastic resin covering another glass disc – effectively scratching out a musical score to be scanned by the machine. Shining a light through the aligned discs would trigger the ANS’ 20 photocells, converting the visual information into sounds. It was even possible to play all of the the 720 microtones simultaneously, by simply scratching a straight line across the disc.”

“’He sought not the author of music,’ explained Artemiev of his vague brief for Solaris, “but the organiser of audio space of the film.’

What sold Artemiev to Tarkovsky was a visit to the groundbreaking electronic music studio where Artemiev worked alongside the mathematician and optics engineer Yevgeny Murzin. The studio housed Murzin and Artemiev’s hulking metallic baby – the ANS synthesiser; an electronic music-making machine unlike any that had preceded or followed it.

Murzin began work on his synth in 1937 and it took 20 years to build. Research into new musical instruments was largely prohibited by the state, and despite the not-inconsiderable innovations of Leon Theremin, creating electronic instruments in Russia was considered a criminal act. Buying the required components was impossible, so inventors had to steal them from institutions…

Murzin’s hero was the early 20th Century occultist and composer Alexander Nikolayevich Scriabin, who developed intricate and atonal musical systems based on theosophy, mysticism and synaesthesia. Christening his machine with Scriabin’s initials, Murzin set about applying some of the mystic’s methodology to electronic music.

For instance, the ANS did not work in 12-tone scales. Instead, it could summon 720 sine waves, which were printed across five glass discs. The discs were arranged so that the low frequencies were at the bottom of the disc and the high frequencies were at the top. Overall, the available microtones spanned 10 octaves.

For the composer to access the tones, they were required to scratch lines in non-drying black mastic resin covering another glass disc – effectively scratching out a musical score to be scanned by the machine. Shining a light through the aligned discs would trigger the ANS’ 20 photocells, converting the visual information into sounds. It was even possible to play all of the the 720 microtones simultaneously, by simply scratching a straight line across the disc.”

eff’s presentation on Open WIreless (temporarily) recommends an older router (2011)

center for investigative journalism linked to last week recommended that when the highest level of security is needed, a pre-2008 laptop.

future of security was 5+ years ago.

[HOPE X] post privacy - tante

post privacy 

 ”The social construct of privacy is rather new, a result of the civil society. It was supposed to protect people from the state and/or government and its overreach, a “right to be let alone,” as one of the central legal texts defined it. Privacy promised a safe space for the individual to develop new ideas without premature criticism and discrimination, a space where individual freedom unfolded. Did it really deliver on that promise? And was that the promise we needed as a society? Privacy isn’t dead as some people might want to tell you, but it has changed significantly in its definition, in its relevance. And it no longer works as the central foundation of our social utopias. Private people are alone, powerless, and often invisible when faced with exactly those powerful entities that the Internet was supposed to help us fight (corporations, government agencies, etc.). Under the blanket term #postprivacy, some people have started developing ideas on how to rethink how we can harness not only the power of the Internet but the powers, ideas, and skills of each other. How will we as a social structure work between social networks, government snooping, and encryption? How can we save and form the future? This talk will give you a few new ideas.”

other talks:

Quinn Norton – When You Are the Adversary
If your name isn’t Barton Gellman, Laura Poitras, or Glenn Greenwald, chances are that while the NSA may be a rights-violating threat to all, it’s not your actual, day-to-day adversary. Real world adversaries tend to be spouses, parents, bosses, school administrators, random drive-by malware, and maybe local law enforcement. While federal threats create a terrible security culture, they aren’t stepping into the lives of most people. And while obsessing over various intelligence agencies and trying to build tools against them makes you feel like a badass, it doesn’t help most people. Fixing Flash and building easy to use communication tools does change the lives of countless people. This talk will focus on the infosec needs of the 99 percent – who aren’t geeks. This talk will touch upon the value of bad crypto when it lets someone escape an abusive spouse, and the common situations where tools that let people sidestep the requirements of their IT departments make the world a better place. Yes, the big bad guys still matter, but fighting a billion little bad guys probably matters more.

Johannes Grenzfurthner - Fuckhackerfucks!
An Audience Bashing
Johannes of art tech group monochrom will indulge in a public rant about hacker culture and why it has to be saved from itself. Expect strong language, indecency, and valid critique of the status quo of hackdom.

likeafieldmouse:

Sarah Schönfeld - All You Can Feel

"Since the 1950s, we in the western world have increasingly come to understand our most intimate desires and experiences as the products of a so-called ‘chemical self’. We can explain moods, angers and diseases both physiological and psychological as an imbalance of substances in the body.

All of this, of course, takes place against the backdrop of a constantly shifting legal and political climate regarding the regulation of different types of mood-altering substances.

What do all these substances actually look like when their essence is visually depicted?

Schönfeld squeezed drops of various legal and illegal liquid drug mixtures onto negative film which had
already been exposed. Each drop altered the coating of the film.

Much like the effect of some of these substances on humans, this can be a lengthy process – sometimes one that can barely be stopped.

She then enlarged these negatives including the chemical reaction of the particular drug, to sizes of up to 160 x 200cm.”

1. Valium

2. Ketamine

3. Speed

4. Crystal Meth

5. Solian

6. Magic

7. Orphiril

8. Pharmaceutical Speed

9. Dopamine 

10. Cocaine

(via w-oman-and-m-achine)

(Source: w-oman-and-m-achine)

brucesterling:

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/fb-mood-manipulator/
*Hahaha almost too easy

“Facebook and Google seem very powerful, but they live about a week from total ruin all the time. They know the cost of leaving social networks individually is high, but en masse, becomes next to nothing. ”
Quinn Norton

brucesterling:

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/fb-mood-manipulator/

*Hahaha almost too easy

Facebook and Google seem very powerful, but they live about a week from total ruin all the time. They know the cost of leaving social networks individually is high, but en masse, becomes next to nothing. ”

Quinn Norton